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This bibliography is an extensive collection of Montessori sources that have been built on a solid foundation of bibliographies previously compiled by numerous individuals and organizations. We are simply improving upon this work by updating and adding more source content and providing links to digitized source material, when available.

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the global Montessori movement

Article

The making of Maria Montessori

Available from: magonlinelibrary.com (Atypon)

Publication: Early Years Educator, vol. 24, no. 10

Pages: 1-2

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Abstract/Notes: In the first article in a new series all about Maria Montessori, Sarah Cummins, senior lecturer in the School of Education at Leeds Trinity University, shares more about Montessori’s background, her history and the origin of her pioneering ideas.

DOI: 10.12968/eyed.2024.24.10.5

ISSN: 1465-931X

Article

Funded Childcare Should Prioritise Quality

Available from: MAG Online Library

Publication: Children and Young People Now, vol. 2024, no. 5

Pages: 19

Child care, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education

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Language: English

DOI: 10.12968/cypn.2024.5.19

ISSN: 1755-8093

Article

âś“ Peer Reviewed

Maria Montessori’s Cosmic Education: The origins of a still-relevant project

Available from: Edizioni Erickson

Publication: Pedagogia piĂą Didattica, vol. 10, no. 1

Pages: 46-60

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Abstract/Notes: As is well known, Maria Montessori’s pedagogy, at the beginning of the last century, brought about a radical change in the teacher’s relationship with her pupils: educating means to provide the tools for the child to develop his or her personality to the full in self-fulfilment with others. This article therefore focuses on the Cosmic Education project that Maria Montessori elaborated and experimented with during the period she lived in India, and which was aimed at children aged 6 to 12. Some derivations of Montessori’s reflections are then traced in the 2012 National Directions for the Curriculum for Preschool and First Cycle Education. In fact, the latter take up what Montessori has always maintained, namely the importance of not separating basic cultural literacy from education to the principles of civil coexistence, providing the necessary tools for autonomous, conscious and responsible thinking and acting with regard to the entire cosmos. / Com’è noto, la pedagogia di Maria Montessori, all’inizio del secolo scorso, realizza un cambiamento radicale nel rapporto dell’insegnante con gli allievi: educare significa fornire gli strumenti affinché il bambino sviluppi al meglio la propria personalità nell’autorealizzarsi insieme agli altri. Il presente articolo focalizza perciò l’attenzione sul progetto di educazione cosmica che Maria Montessori elabora e sperimenta durante il periodo da lei vissuto in India, rivolto ai bambini dai 6 ai 12 anni. Vengono poi rintracciate alcune derivazioni delle riflessioni montessoriane nelle Indicazioni nazionali per il curriculo della scuola d’infanzia e del primo ciclo di istruzione del 2012. Queste ultime riprendono infatti quanto Montessori ha sempre sostenuto, ovvero l’importanza di non scindere l’alfabetizzazione culturale di base da un’educazione ai principi della convivenza civile, fornendo gli strumenti necessari a un pensiero e a un agire autonomi, consapevoli e responsabili nei confronti dell’intero cosmo.

Language: Italian

DOI: 10.14605/PD101244

ISSN: 2421-2946

Master’s Thesis (M. Arch.)

Absorbent Minds: Challenging Utopia Through Atmospheric Architecture

Available from: North Dakota State University Library

Architecture, Classroom environments, Learning environments, Montessori schools

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Abstract/Notes: Since the time of John Amos Comenius the way in which we teach has remained constant. A simplified metaphor for learning amplifies the argument that the view of early education is in a utopian state. When in reality the curriculum is a mold to fit learners into, that prepares them to become a cog in the wheel we call the workforce. The goal is to combat this problem using principles from both the Maria Montessori and Reggio Emilia approaches to learning to create an atmosphere that inspires learners and allows for the flourishing of creativity and self-discovery. This thesis aims to reinterpret what it means to practice a deeper meaning of learning in and out of the classroom setting.

Language: English

Published: Fargo, North Dakota, 2024

Article

Text Mining of Monologues by Waldorf and Montessori Teacher Trainers

Available from: Eszterházy Károly Catholic University

Publication: ACTA Universitatis, Sectio Paedagogica, vol. 45

Pages: 255-274

Comparative education, Montessori method of education – Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education – Teacher training, Teacher training, Teachers, Waldorf method of education – Criticism, interpretation, etc., Waldorf method of education – Teacher training

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Abstract/Notes: Using text-mining methods and a genealogical discourse analysis, our comparative study aims to explore the views of Waldorf and Montessori teacher trainers. The data was collected through structured interviews. The sample consists of eight respondents involved in Montessori teacher training and eight respondents involved in Waldorf teacher training (N-total = 16). Our research objective is to identify the lexical and narratological features, similarities and differences in the monologues of expert teachers with the aim of their interpretive evaluation. The literature review provides a brief summary of recent research on didactics and effectiveness, as well as some critiques of Montessori and Waldorf pedagogy.

Language: English

ISSN: 2630-9742

Article

Last Laugh

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 36, no. 2

Pages: 55

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Baking and Woodworking: Practical Life in Upper Elementary

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 36, no. 2

Pages: 49

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Abstract/Notes: In woodworking, students are introduced to a range of hand and power tools, and take part in both individual and group projects. Woodworking offers a unique control of error-either the piece of wood is cut correctly or not-allowing students to experience the satisfaction of tangible progress. PRACTICAL LIFE IN UPPER ELEMENTARY,” PAGE 49 During the summer; one of my favorite things to do is to get outside and connect with nature.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Crafting the Path: Fiber Arts for Elementary Practical Life

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 36, no. 2

Pages: 42

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Abstract/Notes: Primary Montessori guides dedicate a substantial portion of their curriculum to cultivating Practical Life skills-devoting several classroom shelves to activities such as pouring, spooning, and table washing, and taking time to teach the skills of self-care and care of the environment, as well as Grace and Courtesy. Lower and Upper Elementary students have likely moved beyond spooning and pouring activities, but they still need Practical Life work that mirrors real-life scenarios. […]are those the only ways we can offer these older students Practical Life work? I have a particular interest in fiber arts and crafts, and in this article, I will share my experience implementing fiber arts Practical Life activities in Elementary classrooms. Implementing sign-up lists for various fiber arts activities can be very helpful; at least until a sufficient number of students have had enough training to be able to provide lessons to their peers. Having sign-up lists also reassures students that their turn will come; alleviating the need for constant checking of the shelf to determine tool availability and bringing order and fairness to this age group (children at this age; as you know; are keenly aware of these principles).

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Cultivating Belonging

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 36, no. 2

Pages: 34

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Abstract/Notes: All my working to assimilate, wearing uncomfortable clothes to be the best dressed, combing out my curls and brushing my hair flat, always stressing, arriving everywhere early, striving for perfectionism-it had all paid off. The girls complaint and the officer s “discretionary” action had the power to stop my life in its tracks, to literally halt my potential, at 12 years old. […]only because my parents secured an attorney and the girl was a no-show for the court date-the assault charge was dismissed. Cruising along at the speed limit, listening to the radio, I saw the dreaded red-and-blue lights flashing behind me.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

The Woman Behind Maria Montessori: Mary Pyle

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 36, no. 2

Pages: 33

Adelia McAlpin Pyle – Biographic sources, Maria Montessori – Biographic sources

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Abstract/Notes: James made his fortune in the soap business; while Adelaide’s family tied by marriage to the Rockefellers; prospered in tobacco and real estate (including the Hotel McAlpin; one of the largest hotels in Manhattan). Young Adelia became proficient in French; Spanish, German; and Italian; and attended finishing school to learn music, dance, voice; and the art of teaching. Baptized and raised Presbyterian; her time in Europe proved to be a powerful draw toward the Catholic faith; and she was officially confirmed into the Catholic church; taking the new baptismal name of Maria/Mary.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040